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Today, Yarmouth is a popular dining destination, with as of June fourteen sit-down restaurants.

How Ferguson Became Ferguson

Discovering the Cartography of the Past

There was also limited production of maps of the war fronts, but this was a hard time for her fledgling company. In , returning from a trip to Amsterdam where they were printing a new edition of the London map to get round shortages of paper in England, she was involved in a plane crash which left her with permanent scars. In , she turned her company, the Geographers' A—Z Map Co, into a trust to ensure that it was never bought out.

This secured the future of her company and its employees. Through her donation of her shares to the trust, she was able to enshrine her desired standards and behaviours for the company into its statutes. A respected typographer , although not credited with the design of any typefaces , her arrangement of type is considered one of the most interesting of her age.

The 'A to Z' type-style for street names was for decades a conspicuously hand-drawn sans-serif. She designed the type for a few children's encyclopaedias and some other titles, though her slant was always toward publishing. She wrote about her early days in From Bedsitter to Household Name , published by her own company. In her later years, she lived in Shoreham-by-Sea , West Sussex, and died of cancer on 28 August , a month before her 90th birthday.

The other machine was named Ada, after Ada Lovelace. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 8 September Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The New York Times. Antique County Map of Durham circa Antique County Map of Essex circa Antique County Map of Fermanagh, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Galway, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Gloucestershire circa Antique County Map of Hampshire circa Antique County Map of Hereford circa Antique County Map of Herefordshire circa Antique County Map of Hertfordshire circa Antique County Map of Huntingdonshire circa Antique County Map of Kent circa Antique County Map of Kerry, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Kildare, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Kilkenny, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Lancashire circa Antique County Map of Leicestershire circa Antique County Map of Limerick, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Lincolnshire circa Antique County Map of Longford, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Louth, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Mayo, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Meath, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Middlesex circa Antique County Map of Monaghan, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Monmouthshire circa Antique County Map of Norfolk circa Antique County Map of Northampton North circa Antique County Map of Northamptonshire circa Antique County Map of Northamptonshire South circa Antique County Map of Northumberland circa Antique County Map of Nottinghamshire circa Antique County Map of Oxfordshire circa Antique County Map of Roscommon, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Rutland circa Antique County Map of Shropshire circa Antique County Map of Shropshire North circa Antique County Map of Sligo, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Somerset circa Antique County Map of Somersetshire circa Antique County Map of Staffordshire circa Antique County Map of Suffolk circa Antique County Map of Surrey circa Antique County Map of Sussex circa Antique County Map of Tipperary, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Tyrone, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Warwickshire circa Antique County Map of Waterford, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Westmorland circa Antique County Map of Wexford, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Wicklow, Ireland circa Antique County Map of Wiltshire circa Antique County Map of Worcestershire circa Antique Illustration Botanical 1 circa Antique Illustration Botanical 2 circa Antique Illustration Botanical 3 circa Antique Illustration of Aeronautics circa Antique Illustration of Animals - Horse and Zebra circa Antique Illustration of Animals - Lepus or Rabbit circa Antique Illustration of Animals - Zebra circa Antique Illustration of Birds - Eggs circa Antique Illustration of Birds - Parakeets circa Antique Illustration of Birds - Parakeets I circa Antique Illustration of Breeds of Cattle circa Antique Illustration of Breeds of Chicken circa Antique Illustration of Breeds of Pig circa Antique Illustration of Breeds of Sheep circa Antique Illustration of British Butterflies circa Antique Illustration of British Moths circa Antique Illustration of Butterflies circa Antique Illustration of Canons circa Antique Illustration of Chickens - Leghorns circa Antique Illustration of Chickens - Partridge circa Antique Illustration of Chickens - White Brahmaputras circa Antique Illustration of Chickens circa Antique Illustration of Clouds circa Antique Illustration of Column Architecture circa Antique Illustration of Eddystone Lighthouse circa Antique Illustration of Fish - Mackerel circa Antique Illustration of Fish - Poissons I circa Antique Illustration of Fish - Whiting circa Antique Illustration of Fish circa Antique Illustration of Flowers - Periwinkle circa Antique Illustration of Flowers - Poppy circa Antique Illustration of Flowers - Snowdrop I circa Antique Illustration of Flowers Campion circa Antique Illustration of Flowers Orchids circa Antique Illustration of Flowers Yellow Poppies circa Antique Illustration of French Lighthouse circa Antique Illustration of Frogs and Toads circa Antique Illustration of Fruit - Blackberries circa Antique Illustration of Fruit - Apples I circa Antique Illustration of Fruit - Cherries circa Antique Illustration of Fruit - Exotic circa Antique Illustration of Fruit - Gooseberries circa However Elizabeth I seems to have been satisfied and, on July 20th , granted Saxton a licence for the exclusive publication of the maps for a ten year period.

Camden died in but editions of his work in English continued to be published until It was the first descriptive survey of the British Isles. T he first estate maps were essentially diagrams accompanying written descriptions. These were supplemented by enclosure maps which showed areas of communal land to be enclosed by agreement and from , with improved surveying tools, these were drawn with greater accuracy.

From Parliamentary enclosures had legal authority. John Norden, a Somerset estate surveyor, invented the triangular table of distances that is still familiar today at the back of road atlases and also overlaid a grid with reference numbers and letters so you refer to the square where a feature appeared.

In he began publishing a series of county histories with maps - England, an Intended Guyde for English Travailers incorporating roads for the first time and his mileage tables, explained thus: The use of this Table. The Towns or places between which you desire to know, the distance you may find in the names of the Towns in the upper part and in the side, and bring them in a square as the lines will guide you: And if you find any place in the side which will not extend to make a square with that above, then seeking that above which will not extend to make a square, and see that in the upper, and the other side, and it will show you the distance.

It is familiar and easy. Bear with defects, the use is necessary. The reworking of survey data brought up some curious anomalies. It could be bought in black and white or hand-coloured which added about half as much again to the price. Further editions followed in and The engraving was carried out by the Flemish engraver Jodocus Hondius Senior , a leading engraver and mapmaker in Amsterdam who had lived in England from to The county shown in the examples below is Herefordshire; the three versions show very clearly the difference a good hand colourist can make to legibility and presentation.

Uniquely it includes panoramas of London and Edinburgh, reflecting the recent Union of the Crowns. Also shown are two ancient coin portraits of Britannia and Cunobelinus. The seas are full of monsters, sailing ships, and animals of the realm while cherubs with geographical instruments support the mileage scale in the lower left corner and the Royal Arms appear at upper left above the image of London.

This was the first world atlas produced in England and is full of interesting details including portraits, the elements, constellations and eclipses. California is shown as an island and this fact was copied on many subsequent maps.

A Plan of the River Tees and of the intended Navigable Canal from Stockton by Darlington to Winston in the Bishoprick of Durham is a fine example of the engraved maps needed to impress investors to join the project. This was published in in the Gent Magazine and is based on a survey by Richard Whitworth. T he Manchester Ship Canal was a little larger.

Thirty-six miles 58km long it was built to link the industrial centre of Manchester to the port of Liverpool and still operates today It was designed by civil engineer Sir Edward Leader Williams. However an important local landowner, Sir Humphrey de Trafford, opposed its construction and work only began two years after his death. This developed into the Portolan chart. The maps were engraved by Antonio Francesco Lucini and was first published in in Florence and a second, enlarged edition appeared, posthumously, in P eople had always written down itineries for journeys between cities and Matthew Paris was the first to draw a strip road map for the route from London to Rome.

However John Ogilby from Dundee - took this idea and developed it into a complete set of strip maps for the post roads of England and Wales. He published these in Britannia in , a sheet volume with map pages 34 by 46cm, using a map scale of 1 inch to 1 mile. They were updated and had additions by Kitchin. Now useful notes were appearing. This is the edition. By coincidence the last great county mapmaker, John Cary, produced his first engraved plan in and published his The New and Correct English Atlas whuch was completed in It was so popular that a Cary became an essential household reference book.

I n the early nineteenth century one man turned mapmaking in a new direction. From a simple marking up of a map of the area around Bath, an Oxfordshire land surveyor, William Smith, produced the first geological map of the whole of England based on maps engraved by John Cary. Smith wanted a scale of five miles to the inch and John Cary agreed to bear some of the costs of production.

He made continual corrections and modifications as copies were produced. Around four hundred were produced from to William Smith also produced the ground-breaking Geological Table of British Organized Fossils which served a detailed legend for the geological map. It was a coloured engraving, it measured about 38 by 45 cm and sold at the time for 1s. There was a cholera outbreak in London in and by mapping the deaths shown as short lines on the map and studying their distribution he concluded that the Broad Street Pump, one of thirteen water pumps in Soho, was the likely source deducing that cholera was a water-borne disease, not carried in the foul smell of sewage as most people, including Florence Nightingale, believed.

Interesting to note that the majority of those who died became ill on one night, the 31st August, and died one or two days later. S pecialist maps began to appear in the eighteenth century. B y the late nineteenth century they were fashionable. It was published by Justus Perthes in Gotha, Germany in

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